How Alcohol Detox Can Be Dangerous To Your Recovery

The decision to quit drinking and refrain from any further indulgence with alcohol is, for any person, a laudable decision worthy of all support and encouragement. However while alcohol detox is most certainly admirable, it can also carry a high amount of danger to just suddenly cease any further imbibing of drink. In fact the very shock of depriving your body of alcohol can have severe physical repercussions, and in some cases the shock can even become fatal.

How Alcohol Detox Can Be Dangerous to your Recovery

The causes behind this reaction are simple: your body has become used to having large amounts of alcohol within its system.

The way alcoholism behaves is actually a key instigator behind this state of being. As a person regularly consumes alcohol, the body gradually builds up a natural resistance to the effects it has. This requires increasingly large amounts of alcohol in order for the dependent to feel the effects once more, and the body gradually becomes addicted to the substance. The crash of coming back to sobriety also worsens, with the afflicted soon drinking heavily just to feel “normal”.

As it becomes adapted to dealing with the high alcohol content in your biochemistry the amount of shock it can inflict on your system when deprived increases rapidly. In particularly acute cases, the effects of alcohol withdrawal can occur within as little as two hours, although it’s more usual for it to start six or twelve hours later. Those withdrawal conditions can then last for weeks or even months all throughout the alcohol detox process.

The physical affects at first are relatively minor -- most usually shaking hands, cold sweat and insomnia. However, as it proceeds the effects gradually grow worse, up to and including seizures, hallucinations and delirium. All these lead to an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, which in a small number of cases can be fatal, as much as 5% of cases. The risk to health is amplified if the withdrawee suffers from additional health problems as well, such as lung or heart disease.

Regardless of your overall health, it is important to see a physician or GP before you undergo alcohol detox. Doing so will enable them to prescribe the proper course of action, or even submit you to a hospital for more round-the-clock monitoring.

One thing that also may pose a risk to people going through alcohol detox is the amount of dehydration they may undergo as a result of the alcohol in their systems. Drinking water regularly will help keep them hydrated, as well as helping their body to more thoroughly wash out their system of the toxins, promoting a fast recovery.

For further information about alcohol detox and other aspects surrounding recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol, visit the website of We Do Recover, or alternatively you can phone them directly by calling 0800 955 4357.

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